Uninsurable Dogs: What Everyone Ought To Know


Uninsurable Dogs Can Cost You For Home Insurance

It shouldn’t be surprising that insurers are very particular about which dog breeds they insure. After all, 4.5 million Americans are bitten by a dog each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While most of these bites are not fatal, they cost insurance companies $30,000 per claim on average, according to the Insurance Information Institute. Because of these high costs, your whole house might be uninsurable if you have one of the most uninsurable dogs. But that’s not all. Insurers can also refuse to renew your coverage if your dog has bitten someone, raise your premiums if your dog makes the "dangerous breeds" list, and even exclude your dog from your insurance policy completely. Lucky for you, there are ways to insure your home, even with a dog breed that’s made the uninsurable dog breeds list. Here’s how:

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These Dog Breeds Might Make You Uninsurable

The list of uninsurable dog breeds varies slightly from city to city. Here are the dog breeds that make the list most often:
  • Akita
  • Alaskan Malamute
  • Chow Chow
  • Doberman Pinscher
  • German Shepherd
  • Pit Bull
  • Presa Canario
  • Rottweiler
  • Siberian Husky
  • Staffordshire Bull Terrier
  • Wolf Hybrids
When deciding whether or not to insure a dog breed, insurers turn to statistics. One commonly cited statistic is that Pit Bulls accounted for 62.2 percent of dog bite-related deaths from 2005 to 2013. As a result, Pit Bulls are one of the hardest breeds to insure, especially if they show signs of aggression.

SEE ALSO: Home Insurance Advice: Why You Need Umbrella Insurance

But There Are Ways Around The System

Insurers know that not all dogs of a certain breed are aggressive. They also know that aggressive dogs can be trained to act calmly around people. Take this Pit Bull mix as an example: That's why there are ways to insure your dog and your home, even if your dog makes the above list. The first step is getting safe dog certifications. These include:
  • An obedience school certification
  • A letter from your dog’s veterinarian
  • A note from your insurance agent, which you can get once they have met your dog
Even if your dog isn’t insurable, you can still insure your home. Excluding your dog from your policy only means that you will have to pay damages if your dog bites someone. If you have complete faith in your dog, this might be the best option. Otherwise, you might consider getting an umbrella policy. Either which way, don’t give up your dog right away. You have options.

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